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The week’s winding down and coming to a close, so let’s celebrate by taking a trip down memory lane. To get to know next week’s printed artists a little better, we asked them what their earliest art-related memories are. Check out the quotes and latest designs below before you head home to kick it for the weekend. Be sure to revisit Threadless on Monday to pick up the new tees.

Q: What’s your earliest art-related memory?

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“I have many, but I think the earliest involves hanging out in my parents’ darkroom (they’re both photographers). I remember sitting on a high stool. Sometimes we would make photograms by laying some objects or my toys directly on photo paper and exposing the paper to light. Then we would develop that paper. They also listened to great music in there. Fun times!”

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“My earliest art-related memory is probably drawing dinosaurs on any surface available. Good to see that I’ve moved on.”

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“Funnily enough, my earliest art memory is breakfast-food related. I remember watching my mother make animal and snowman shaped pancakes; it blew my mind that she could do that. She would let me decorate them with fruit and chocolate chips and I remember taking it waaaay too seriously.”

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“My earliest art memory is maybe one traumatic experience I had in kindergarten. I was happily colouring a clown with a new pencil when the opportunity came to go outside and play. I was faced with a serious dilemma: finish the clown, or go and have fun outside. Luckily, a friend of mine was on hand to help, he offered to finish the clown for me in my absence. When I made it back inside after playing, however, I found my friend had crudely coloured with no respect for the lines, and my poor pencil was totally blunt. It was a terrible day.”

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“Re-drawing Dragon Ball figures on paper and sticking them on the wall.”

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Back in Guatemala, my family made a living by making dolls dressed to look like the indigenous people still living in Guatemala. We sold these dolls at the airport and other stores frequented by tourists. These dolls were a form of art, requiring a huge amount of sewing (by machine and hand), tailoring, and crafting. Plus, they allowed us to be in frequent contact with all all the items by different artists sold at the same store. In short, I was surrounded by art from a very early age, and I carry with me those memories and lessons everyday.” - soloyo